Just Another Massacre — Andrew Joyce

https://read.amazon.com/kp/card?preview=inline&linkCode=kpd&ref_=k4w_oembed_0yG3Gi1GsxcH6s&asin=B01LXOXHBI&tag=kpembed-20 Shoshone Indians in the 19th century. (Library of Congress) By Dana Hedgpeth (Published in The Washington Post, September 26, 2021) Historians consider it the worst massacre of Native Americans in U.S. history. Yet few have ever heard of it. The Bear River Massacre of 1863 near what’s now Preston, Idaho, left roughly 350 members … Continue reading Just Another Massacre — Andrew Joyce

Pretty and Dumb? Tell It to the Avocado

Longreads

When Christopher Columbus first encountered “Indians,” he formed the opinion: “These are very simple-minded and handsomely formed people.” As Robert Jago explains for The Walrus, this unjustified view of Native incompetence has persisted in some non-Natives to this day — even encountered in the way his tribe currently fishes the river named after them.

in another news report, they advised that any salmon bought from us poses a “significant risk to human health.”

Our catch is fine for us to eat, apparently—it’s just a problem for “human” health.

Stó:lō means “river people,” and this river is full of salmon—or, at least, it used to be. It’s our staple food, eaten smoked, baked, boiled, and candied. My grandma prized the eyes, plucked out and sucked on till they popped and released their fishy goo. My nephew goes for the eggs; he quite literally licks his lips at the sight…

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“once a Ticuna man is born, a tree is born” Life In The Depths Of The Amazon Jungle — Edge of Humanity Magazine

Photographer Ovidio Gonzalez Soler is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this documentary photography. From the ongoing project ‘Neoticuna’. To see Ovidio’s body of work, click on any image. The rivers, in high water season, come loaded with fish, it is a favorable time for fishing. Only practiced by the most mature.… via “once a … Continue reading “once a Ticuna man is born, a tree is born” Life In The Depths Of The Amazon Jungle — Edge of Humanity Magazine