The Crying Forest

The Crying Forest exhibition puts Amazon deforestation under the spotlight

The Crying Forest

French street artist and photographer Philippe Echaroux is bringing to light the impact of deforestation on the Amazonian Paiter Surui tribe.

The Crying Forest

In a project, entitled ‘The Crying Forest’, Philippe  Echaroux captured portraits of the indigenous tribe of western Brazil and projected them on to trees in their native land.
The Crying Forest
Photographs from ‘The Crying Forest’ are currently on display at the Galerie Taglialatella in Paris, until 15 December.

Philippe Echaroux visited the Paiter Surui tribe earlier this year, where he photographed the indigenous natives for his project. The artist and photographer then created an installation by enlarging and projecting the images over Amazonian trees in the Surui area.

The Crying Forest

The Paiter Surui tribe currently numbers around 1,300 people. Through his art, Echaroux is raising awareness of the dangers of deforestation and the impact on the tribe and their lives.

Almir Narayamoga Surui, the chief of the Paiter Surui tribe, has been given the task of replanting and protecting part of the rainforest by the Brazilian government.
The Crying Forest
He said: “Since the beginning of this year, we are undergoing a total invasion of deforesters and miners of diamonds and gold.

“Every day, 300 trucks leave our territory filled with wood, which represents 600 hectares of deforested forests. And it continues to increase, whilst according to the Constitution of Brazil, it is illegal to deforest an indigenous reservation.

“On the ground, the illegal loggers have heavy means, with caterpillar machines. We have found mercury and cyanide in three rivers of Surui territory because of the miners.”
The Crying Forest
In the past 40 years, 20% of the Amazon rain-forest has been destroyed.

Philippe Echaroux added: “Victims of massive deforestation and gold washers who did not hesitate to violate the Surui’s territory to seize deposits of precious stones, the Surui people want to raise awareness of this horrible and greedy slaughter that endangers a territory and its people.”
The Crying Forest
All images: © Philippe Echaroux

The Crying Forest exhibition is on at the Galerie Taglialatella, Paris until 15 December: http://www.djtfa-paris.com. More from Philippe Echaroux: http://www.philippe-echaroux.com

Rosalind Medea is a journalist, intuitive reader and spiritual life coach. She writes about sustainable life&style, music, arts and spirituality. She also helps people find their groove in becoming their true selves and integrating their spirituality in to their daily lives. Follow Rosalind on Twitter: https://twitter.com/rosalindmedea

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9 responses to “The Crying Forest

  1. Reblogged this on mira prabhu and commented:
    French street artist and photographer Philippe Echaroux is bringing to light the impact of deforestation on the Amazonian Paiter Surui tribe. In a project, entitled ‘The Crying Forest’, Philippe Echaroux captured portraits of the indigenous tribe of western Brazil and projected them on to trees in their native land. Thanks for this wonderful share, Adele Ulnais!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Amazing portrayals of a vanishing landscape. I do believe it could portend the end of human dominion on Earth as well. What we have done; and are still doing, is unsustainable to the well-being of our planet. True… None of us will live long enough to see the demise of civilization as we know it, but, if current trends continue, it is inevitable.

    Liked by 1 person

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